Saturday, 1 July 2017

The Battle of Medway 1667

Upnor - Sunday 11th June 2017

For the 350th anniversary of the last attack on British soil by the Dutch, English Heritage put on a re-enactment weekend for its members (and other casual visitors) to commemorate the daring deed. It was a brave attack that was most successful in its outcome: several Royal Navy warships were fired and/or sunk, a few were towed off as trpohies. However, most importantly of all for the Dutch, they had carried off a daring raid on a naval depot that was supposed to be well-defended and burnt the beard of King Charles II. At the time, this was the worst defeat of the Royal Navy in terms of cost - £200,000 at the time, with the loss of around 13 ships, of which four were Ships of the Line.

What has this to do with beer, I hear you ask? Well, GW and I had all the best intentions at heart to go watch the re-enactment, but we got caught up at the Tudor Rose by a fine Sunday lunch and a few ales to wash it down, and missed all the action! Still, at least we heard the gun shots and cannon fire.

The Tudor Rose
31, 29 High St, Upper Upnor, Rochester, Kent ME2 4XG
We arrived at the pub in high spirits and, after ordering a beer and some pork scratchings at the bar, we headed out into the garden for a chat. The chat led to another beer, and that led to lunch whilst all hell was breaking loose just over the castle wall behind us. Oh well, we still had a great day in the beer garden.

Beers drunk on this visit:
1) Whitstable Bay IPA (3.9%) - Shepherd Neame Brewery, Faversham, Kent - a light, sweet, malty pale ale
2) Whitstable Bay Red IPA (4.5%) - Shepherd Neame Brewery, Faversham, Kent - a deep red pale ale with a malt and citrus flavour

Although both beers are listed as being Whitstable Bay ale brewed at the Faversham Steam Brewery, they are actually brewed by Shepherd Neame. Still, pedantry aside, I like the subtle distinction in brand name.

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